2.2c TEST with YOURSELF Vocabulary from HBR How to Stop Saying Um Ah

Get a hint
verbalize
Click the card to flip 👆
1 / 33
1 / 33
Terms in this set (33)
verbalize
to express ideas, opinions, or emotions in words.

1. Studies suggest that we _________ hesitations because we've been conditioned to fill the void even when we don't have something to say.
hesitation
the act of pausing before doing something, especially because you are nervous or not certain.

1. Studies suggest that we verbalize ___________ because we've been conditioned to fill the void even when we don't have something to say.
be conditioned to do something
to learn over time or been taught to anticipate something

1. So why isn't our speech fluent? Studies suggest that we verbalize hesitations because we've _______________________ fill the void even when we don't have something to say
fill a void
to provide or replace something that's needed

1. Studies suggest that we verbalize hesitations because we've been conditioned to ____________ even when we don't have something to say.
conversational floor
a term used to describe the situation when one person is talking in a group of people, without being interrupted

1. For example, we use "um" and "ah" to hold onto the "________________________" as we are planning what we are going to say next, with "ah" signaling a short delay and "um" signaling a longer delay.
signal
to show that something is going to happen or that you are going to do something.

1. For example, we use "um" and "ah" to hold onto the "conversational floor" as we are planning what we are going to say next, with "ah" _______________ a short delay and "um" _____________ a longer delay.
embrace
to accept something with great interest or enthusiasm.

1. To Eliminate Crutch Words, _________ the Pause
2. Pauses aren't easy to __________.
pause
a moment in which something, such as a sound or an activity, stops before starting again.

1. The good news is that you can turn this weakness into a strength by replacing fillers with _________.
2. Research suggests that most conversational speech consists of short (0.20 seconds), medium (0.60 seconds), and long (over 1 second) _________.
3. Great public speakers often ___________ for two to three seconds or even longer.
phonetic
relating to the sounds made in speaking.

1. Our ___________ data shows that the average speaker only uses 3.5 pauses per minute, and that's not enough.
briefest
lasting only a short time or containing few words.

1. For many speakers, even the _________ pause can feel like an interminable silence
interminable
continuing for too long and seeming never to end.

1. For many speakers, even the briefest pause can feel like an ______________ silence.
tend to do something
to be likely to behave in a particular way or have a particular characteristic.

1. That's because we ________ think faster than we speak.
discrepancy
a difference between two figures, results, etc. that are expected to be the same.

1. Because of this _____________ when you're giving a speech, your perception of time is often distorted, and what feels like an eternity in your mind is actually a few short seconds for the audience.
perception
the way that someone thinks and feels about a company, product, service, etc.

1. Because of this discrepancy, when you're giving a speech, your ________________ of time is often distorted, and what feels like an eternity in your mind is actually a few short seconds for the audience.
distorted
false or wrong.

1. Because of this discrepancy, when you're giving a speech, your perception of time is often ____________, and what feels like an eternity in your mind is actually a few short seconds for the audience.